National Policy Matters – The Affordable Care Act: What Nonprofit Employers Need To Know

The Arc is pleased to announce a new edition of National Policy Matters entitled, “The Affordable Care Act: What Non Profit Employers Need to Know” which explains the basic provisions of the law. Although the Administration recently announced that many of the provisions have been delayed one year in order to have more implementation time, employers will still need to plan for the new requirements. This publication will provide an overview of:

  • What will the ACA require of employers?
  • What penalties are imposed on large employers?
  • Can employers keep their current health insurance?
  • Can non-profits apply for tax credits?
  • What additional provisions apply?

We hope this publication will serve as a tool to you and your chapters as new steps in implementation begin. Please check The Capitol Insider Blog’s Health Care section for additional resources on implementation of the ACA.

National Policy Matters – The Affordable Care Act: What Nonprofit Employers Need To Know

National Policy Matters – The Chained CPI Cuts Social Security and SSI: What Disability Advocates Need To Know

With Congress gearing up for more “fiscal cliff” battles this year, The Arc is concerned about threats to Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI). These lifelines provide essential financial security for millions of Americans, including people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). The Arc believes that Social Security and SSI should not be part of deficit reduction, and that any changes to these systems must be carefully evaluated in terms of their effects on beneficiaries. This issue of National Policy Matters looks at one major threat to Social Security and SSI, the chained Consumer Price Index (“chained CPI”).

  • The chained CPI cuts Social Security and SSI benefits by reducing annual cost of living increases. Cuts add up significantly over time and would disproportionately harm people with disabilities.
  • The chained CPI also cuts veterans pensions and certain military and civilian retirement benefits, and would limit eligibility for over 30 vital programs such as Head Start and the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program.
  • The chained CPI has been considered as part of most major deficit reduction proposals over the last several years, and has at different times been supported by Members of Congress from both political parties and by the White House.
  • The public strongly opposes cutting Social Security, including through the chained CPI.

National Policy Matters – The Chained CPI Cuts Social Security and SSI: What Disability Advocates Need To Know

National Policy Matters – The Affordable Care Act: What Disability Advocates Need To Know

Now that the U.S. Supreme Court has affirmed the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the disability community must work to better understand the law and the many benefits it can provide to people with disabilities. This will be critical to the community’s role in helping to move states forward with implementation.

Numerous ACA provisions related to both acute care and long term services and supports hold great promise for improving the health and well-being of people with disabilities. This issue of National Policy Matters provides information about the major provisions and the status of their implementation.

National Policy Matters – The Affordable Care Act: What Disability Advocates Need To Know

Report: ‘My Thinker’s Not Working’

Link

http://aadmd.org/sites/default/files/NTG_Thinker_Report.pdf (PDF)

Description

This report, by the National Task Group on Intellectual Disabilities and Dementia Practices, summarizes challenges in the United States surrounding the increasing rate of older people with intellectual and developmental disabilities having dementia. The report finds that though the research about the causes and factors influencing dementia and Alzheimer’s disease are better known, the social care system still remains challenged with offering the best and most efficacious ways to identify, support, and care for older people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and dementia.

This report also offers recommendations and suggestions on how to address the needs and help adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities affected by dementia. These include: early and periodic diagnostic services, training and education about dementia, and community-based and home-based supports for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities affected by dementia.

Source

Submitted by The Arc.

Website: Community Action Network (CAN) Project

Link

http://www.arcvc.org

Description

The purpose of the Community Action Network (CAN) project is to provide transition age youth an opportunity for a time limited, comprehensive, and inclusive post-secondary experience that includes educational, vocational, and social opportunities. At its core, this project integrates best practices, such as person-centered thinking and self determination, as the guiding principles and actions that assist individuals to achieve greater influence, independence, and control as they transition into adult life. This multi-disciplinary style and multi-learning approach meets the student where their strengths lie and accommodate barriers in a multitude of strategies.

Source

Submitted by The Arc of Ventura County.

Website: Keep Achieving (KACH) at Brookdale

Link

http://www.arcofmonmouth.org/kach

Description

The Arc of Monmouth has collaborated with Brookdale Community College to address the needs of transitioning young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities ages 18 – 21 that have accepted their high school diploma and elected a college experience; and 21 – 26 year-olds who have graduated high school and would like to continue their education. The project provides a variety of classroom and experiential learning at the college and in the community over six college semesters during a three-year period. At the completion of their college experience, students should gain the skills and confidence necessary for them to succeed in their chosen paid or volunteer career field.

Source

Submitted by Arc of Monmouth.

Website: Community Transition Partnership

Link

http://www.rensselaerarc.org

Description

With self-determination as the cornerstone of this project, young adults with disabilities utilize person-centered planning to direct the course of their own life while surrounded by people that know and care about them. A variety of person-centered planning tools are utilized including the Framework for Planning which provides a structured approach to helping people with disabilities think about their life focus, develop a positive profile, and an action plan to achieve their goals.

Source

Submitted by NYSARC – Rensselaer.

Website: Ready @ 21

Link

http://www.thearcofpgc.org

Description

Ready @ 21, students develop an Individual Development Plan (IDP) that outlines skills needed in the area of education, employment, and community living while focusing on self-advocacy, self-awareness, and self-determination. As the students develop their portfolios and complete career assessments, they identify their own likes, dislikes, strengths, challenges, and areas of interest. The process of developing resumes and cover letters, as well as learning business etiquette, goal setting, public speaking, and interviewing skills provides the students with a multitude of employment readiness skills. In addition, they are supported in locating community resources through role-play, games, group discussions, art projects, and community outings. Students are able to gain awareness of a variety of employment activities on the college campus through workforce development classes and community employers such as Walmart.

Source

Submitted by The Arc of Prince George’s County.

Website: Creating Environments for Ongoing Success

Link

http://www.arcphiladelphia.org

Description

The Philadelphia ARC’s transition program focuses on student-focused planning and transition goal development; career exploration and natural environment learning. The belief is that, people with disabilities can be capable employees if skills and interests are matched and appropriate education and supports are provided. Students are referred and must demonstrate a commitment to being employed. Person centered planning is facilitated and transitional goals are developed. Short-term competitive employment situations are used to transition to longer term vocational opportunities. Training of job site staff is provided to assure that the staff is comfortable with issues of disability and employment.

Source

Submitted by The Arc of Philadelphia.

Website: 360° Approach Transition Project

Link

http://www.arcmass.org

Description

The 360° Approach Transition Project provides intensive transition planning for students in Metro Boston and Newburyport in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. A “whole person-systems” approach helps staff focus on individual student goals, skills, and training needs. Students are encouraged to take on a leadership role. Family members are trained to assist the student to develop collaborative relationships for the purpose of achieving the student’s vision.

Source

Submitted by The Arc of Massachusetts & The Arc of Greater Haverhill and Newburyport .