National Policy Matters – The 2014 Federal Home and Community Based Service Regulation: What You Need to Know

On January 16, 2014 the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services issued final rules in the Federal Register that implemented section 1915(i) State Plan home and community-based services; defined and described home and community-based setting across all Medicaid home and community-based services authorities; defined person-centered planning requirements for sections 1915(c) and 1915(i) home and community-based services; and allowed states to combine target populations in one section 1915(c) waiver.

In order to receive Medicaid reimbursement from the federal government for providing home and community-based services, states must ensure that the services are delivered in settings that meet the new definition of home and community-based (HCB) setting. The primary focus of this National Policy Matters is the new definition of HCB setting.

National Policy Matters – The 2014 Federal Home and Community Based Service Regulation: What You Need to Know

National Policy Matters – Deficit Reduction: What Disability Advocates Need To Know

The Arc succeeded in helping to protect Medicaid in last year’s deficit reduction law, the Budget Control Act. Now there is mounting pressure to find an alternative to cuts mandated by the Budget Control Act or to find additional cuts in the federal budget to reduce the deficit further. We must renew our efforts to protect the four major programs that impact people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) – Medicaid, Medicare, Social Security, and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) – in addition to the many discretionary programs that people with disabilities rely on to be a part of their community.

Disability advocates must remain engaged throughout the coming months to minimize cuts to these programs and protect eligibility and services that are vital to the lives of people with disabilities. Advocates must urge Congress to provide sufficient revenues to fund critical services and supports needed by individuals with I/DD to live and work in the community.

The bottom line is that our work is far from over, and Medicaid continues to be at risk. This analysis aims to educate advocates about the current fiscal situation and its potential impact on people with I/DD.

National Policy Matters – Deficit Reduction: What Disability Advocates Need To Know

Report: ‘My Thinker’s Not Working’

Link

http://aadmd.org/sites/default/files/NTG_Thinker_Report.pdf (PDF)

Description

This report, by the National Task Group on Intellectual Disabilities and Dementia Practices, summarizes challenges in the United States surrounding the increasing rate of older people with intellectual and developmental disabilities having dementia. The report finds that though the research about the causes and factors influencing dementia and Alzheimer’s disease are better known, the social care system still remains challenged with offering the best and most efficacious ways to identify, support, and care for older people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and dementia.

This report also offers recommendations and suggestions on how to address the needs and help adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities affected by dementia. These include: early and periodic diagnostic services, training and education about dementia, and community-based and home-based supports for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities affected by dementia.

Source

Submitted by The Arc.

Website: Life After IEPs

Link

http://lifeafterieps.com

Description

This site provides helpful information, free resources and lots of encouragement for families as they support their child’s transition to a fulfilling self-determined life after high school. Many articles include videos of teens and young adults with disabilities sharing their own journeys. Links to key transition resources are provided and explained in a clear and friendly manner.

Source

Submitted by Life After IEPs

Website: School-to-Community Transition Project

Link

http://www.thearcjackson.org

Description

The purpose is to engage students in year-round activities throughout Jackson County within their home communities. It is well documented that students with developmental and intellectual disabilities benefit greatly from year-round instruction. Research has shown that students that are engaged in meaningful activities year-round are more successful, less likely drop out of school, get into less trouble, and enjoy a better quality of life. The goal is to have initial instruction occur at the Transition site with concurrent instruction being given in the students’ homes and communities and broadened to include non-academic school year services. Toward the end of each student’s Transition period, the final outcome will be full community inclusion. Project activities include: locating employment and volunteer opportunities within students’ communities, learning to create a resume, fill out job applications, and go through the interview process. Additional components include personal safety, community adult and independent living skills, health and wellness, as well as skills for improving communication and social interactions.

Source

Submitted by The Arc of Jackson County.

Website: Transition Support Program (TSP)

Link

http://thearcsf.org

Description

The Arc of San Francisco engages transition age youth and their caregivers by providing open houses, tours, school site visits, and other outreach efforts to enlighten them about community-based services. Parental involvement and education is mandatory for participant enrollment and follows an extended process by which families incrementally deepen their participation in person-centered transition planning. Parents and guardians are offered a monthly newsletter featuring tasks to develop specific skills and quarterly topical workshops that offer guidance, support, and structured activities for preparing their children, and themselves, for transition from school-based to community-based services. The major component of the TSP is transition-age youth skill building for adulthood. Regular, structured activities for transition-age youth with developmental disabilities occurs within a stepped, curriculum which gradually integrates participants in community-based services, independent living, employment, and adult relationships.

Source

Submitted by The Arc of San Francisco.

Website: Building Futures

Link

http://www.ahrcnyc.org/

Description

The goal of the Building Bridges project is to provide the person-centered, coordinated, and cooperative programming necessary to facilitate the transition of students with Autism Spectrum Disorder and cognitive and developmental disabilities from school to the adult world of work, community living, and community membership. Through the use of person-centered planning (PCP) tools students and their families develop a transition plan and identify a vision for the future. The plan identifies activities designed to promote a student’s independence, self-advocacy, and decision-making skills.

Source

Submitted by AHRC – New York City Chapter.

Still in the Shadows with the Future Uncertain

FINDS Report Cover

Still in the Shadows with the Future Uncertain

A report on family and individual needs for disability supports (FINDS)
Summary of Key Findings and A Call To Action
June 2011

The Family and Individual Needs for Disability Supports (FINDS) survey was conducted online from July 22, 2010 to October 31, 2010. The survey was widely disseminated through a variety of groups, including: the Association of University Centers on Disabilities, the American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, the American Network of Community Options and Resources, the National Association of Councils on Developmental Disabilities, Self-Advocates Becoming Empowered, the National Council on Independent Living, Best Buddies, Easter Seals, the Autism Society of America and state and local chapters of The Arc.

Families from all 50 states and DC completed surveys. People with disabilities responded from 38 states and DC. Nearly 5000 caregivers responded (4,962) as did 558 people with disabilities. The vast majority of caregiver respondents were family members (95%) who are living with their family member with disabilities (75%). Additional detail regarding respondents is available in the FINDS Technical Report.

The results are representative of the people who heard about the survey and responded and may not be representative of all people with disabilities and their families. Data analysis was performed by Lynda Anderson, Sheryl A. Larson, Allise Wuorio and K. Charlie Lakin of the Research and Training Center on Community Living, Institute on Community Integration, University of Minnesota.