School to Work Transition Services Virginia Department of Rehabilitative Services

Transition Services assist students in the movement from school to the world of work and adult life. The Department of Rehabilitative Services (DRS) works together with students, families, schools and community agencies to provide services to support this transition.

DRS reccommends that students and families begin to make transition plans at least three years prior to exiting school. DRS provides information and outreach through:

  • Presentations to groups such as families and teachers
  • Technical assistance and individualized consultation
  • Education and training for schools and families

http://www.vadrs.org/downloads/transitionservices.pdf

JAN – Job Accommodation Network

The Job Accommodation Network (JAN) is the leading source of free, expert, and confidential guidance on workplace accommodations and disability employment issues. Working toward practical solutions that benefit both employer and employee, JAN helps people with disabilities enhance their employability, and shows employers how to capitalize on the value and talent that people with disabilities add to the workplace.

http://askjan.org/

Transition Planning

Transition planning is a gigantic topic and a very important one for youth with disabilities, their families, and IEP teams. NICHCY has devoted an entire section of its website to the subject, including articles written expressly for students themselves, school personnel, and parents. Here, in this article, however, we’ll keep it short and focused on what IDEA requires in the IEP for transition-aged students.

http://nichcy.org/schoolage/iep/iepcontents/transition

Parents’ Guide to the Transition of Their Adult Child to College, Career, and Community

This module will increase your knowledge and give you the tools to prepare you for your child’s transition from public school to postsecondary education and his or her emerging adulthood.

Publication: Engaging Youth in Work Experiences

Link

http://www.ncwd-youth.info/innovative-strategies/practice-briefs/engaging-youth-in-work-experiences

Description

This brief describes the strategies and resources used by several successful youth programs to engage youth in work experiences, including youth with disabilities. Work experiences are both paid and unpaid opportunities to work and practice career readiness skills. The work experiences described in this brief include internships, summer jobs, youth-run businesses/entrepreneurship, service projects and volunteer work, and part-time jobs.

Source

Submitted by NCWD/YOUTH

Publication: Leading Practices on Disability Inclusion

Link

http://www.usbln.org/pdf-docs/Leading_Practices_on_Disability_Inclusion.pdf

Description

The US Chamber of commerce and the US Business Leadership Network invited business leaders to share their successful disability inclusion strategies and from that initiative developed “Leading Practices on Disability Inclusion”. This publication highlights successful strategies that can be used by businesses of all sizes to create a more inclusive workplace, marketplace, and supply chain. Real-life examples, such as these, are important to help businesses realize the wide range of opportunities available and the potential for replicating success.

Source

Submitted by the US Chamber of commerce and the US Business Leadership Network

Publication: Green Jobs Resource Guide for Individuals with Disabilities

Link

http://www.dol.gov/odep/pdf/GreenResourceGuide.pdf

Description

Green jobs are jobs in industries that help the environment or use environmentally-friendly materials and processes. This guide includes information about where to search for jobs, training opportunities and job skills associated with the increase in “green” jobs.

Source

Submitted by U.S. Department of Labor

Website: Project SEE

Link

http://www.arcwake.org

Description

Project SEE provides students with access to a variety of work settings/samplings which allow the participating students to make informed vocational choices. Participating students gain valuable insight into their occupational interests and strengths as well as develop skills to enhance their opportunities for employment in the community after completing high school. Project SEE staff encourages the development of natural supports and promotes the philosophy of inclusion, within the work environment. Under the expanded Project SEE school-year program, approximately 20 high school students with developmental disabilities are working at volunteer host job sites with a college student intern job coach. The ratio is two participating students per one student intern job coach. These students are selected in conjunction with case managers and occupational preparation teachers in the Wake County Public School System. The students are paid at the prevailing minimum wage through program funds. Participating high school students with developmental disabilities work at job sites during or at the end of the school day; they are transported from their high school to the job site through transportation provided by the Wake County Public School System. Transportation from the job site to the student’s home is arranged by participating students.

Source

Submitted by The Arc of Wake County.

Website: Transitional Supported Employment from School to Work

Link

http://www.thearcofyorkcounty.org

Description

The Arc of York County’s project is focused on preparing high school students for competitive employment following graduation from public school. Most students with disabilities have very limited or no real life experience with real work prior to graduation. Neither students nor their families are well prepared for the issues of entering the work force. This experience differs from students who do not have a disability who typically will have a part-time job while in school and employment in the summer prior to graduation. The project better prepares students for post-graduation employment by providing real employment experiences during the school year, part-time employment, and summer employment. Paid employment and work experience is the primary objective of the project. The project aims to provide real work experience during the school year as part of the student’s educational program, part-time employment, and summer employment using our supported employment support and training staff. The current school system and community service system for people with intellectual disabilities do not fund/support summer employment or out-of-school service for students. The project provides support for students to gain and maintain employment.

Source

Submitted by The Arc of York County.

Website: School-to-Community Transition Project

Link

http://www.thearcjackson.org

Description

The purpose is to engage students in year-round activities throughout Jackson County within their home communities. It is well documented that students with developmental and intellectual disabilities benefit greatly from year-round instruction. Research has shown that students that are engaged in meaningful activities year-round are more successful, less likely drop out of school, get into less trouble, and enjoy a better quality of life. The goal is to have initial instruction occur at the Transition site with concurrent instruction being given in the students’ homes and communities and broadened to include non-academic school year services. Toward the end of each student’s Transition period, the final outcome will be full community inclusion. Project activities include: locating employment and volunteer opportunities within students’ communities, learning to create a resume, fill out job applications, and go through the interview process. Additional components include personal safety, community adult and independent living skills, health and wellness, as well as skills for improving communication and social interactions.

Source

Submitted by The Arc of Jackson County.