National Policy Matters – The 2014 Federal Home and Community Based Service Regulation: What You Need to Know

On January 16, 2014 the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services issued final rules in the Federal Register that implemented section 1915(i) State Plan home and community-based services; defined and described home and community-based setting across all Medicaid home and community-based services authorities; defined person-centered planning requirements for sections 1915(c) and 1915(i) home and community-based services; and allowed states to combine target populations in one section 1915(c) waiver.

In order to receive Medicaid reimbursement from the federal government for providing home and community-based services, states must ensure that the services are delivered in settings that meet the new definition of home and community-based (HCB) setting. The primary focus of this National Policy Matters is the new definition of HCB setting.

National Policy Matters – The 2014 Federal Home and Community Based Service Regulation: What You Need to Know

National Policy Matters – The Affordable Care Act: What Nonprofit Employers Need To Know

The Arc is pleased to announce a new edition of National Policy Matters entitled, “The Affordable Care Act: What Non Profit Employers Need to Know” which explains the basic provisions of the law. Although the Administration recently announced that many of the provisions have been delayed one year in order to have more implementation time, employers will still need to plan for the new requirements. This publication will provide an overview of:

  • What will the ACA require of employers?
  • What penalties are imposed on large employers?
  • Can employers keep their current health insurance?
  • Can non-profits apply for tax credits?
  • What additional provisions apply?

We hope this publication will serve as a tool to you and your chapters as new steps in implementation begin. Please check The Capitol Insider Blog’s Health Care section for additional resources on implementation of the ACA.

National Policy Matters – The Affordable Care Act: What Nonprofit Employers Need To Know

National Policy Matters – The Chained CPI Cuts Social Security and SSI: What Disability Advocates Need To Know

With Congress gearing up for more “fiscal cliff” battles this year, The Arc is concerned about threats to Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI). These lifelines provide essential financial security for millions of Americans, including people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). The Arc believes that Social Security and SSI should not be part of deficit reduction, and that any changes to these systems must be carefully evaluated in terms of their effects on beneficiaries. This issue of National Policy Matters looks at one major threat to Social Security and SSI, the chained Consumer Price Index (“chained CPI”).

  • The chained CPI cuts Social Security and SSI benefits by reducing annual cost of living increases. Cuts add up significantly over time and would disproportionately harm people with disabilities.
  • The chained CPI also cuts veterans pensions and certain military and civilian retirement benefits, and would limit eligibility for over 30 vital programs such as Head Start and the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program.
  • The chained CPI has been considered as part of most major deficit reduction proposals over the last several years, and has at different times been supported by Members of Congress from both political parties and by the White House.
  • The public strongly opposes cutting Social Security, including through the chained CPI.

National Policy Matters – The Chained CPI Cuts Social Security and SSI: What Disability Advocates Need To Know

National Policy Matters – Deficit Reduction: What Disability Advocates Need To Know

The Arc succeeded in helping to protect Medicaid in last year’s deficit reduction law, the Budget Control Act. Now there is mounting pressure to find an alternative to cuts mandated by the Budget Control Act or to find additional cuts in the federal budget to reduce the deficit further. We must renew our efforts to protect the four major programs that impact people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) – Medicaid, Medicare, Social Security, and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) – in addition to the many discretionary programs that people with disabilities rely on to be a part of their community.

Disability advocates must remain engaged throughout the coming months to minimize cuts to these programs and protect eligibility and services that are vital to the lives of people with disabilities. Advocates must urge Congress to provide sufficient revenues to fund critical services and supports needed by individuals with I/DD to live and work in the community.

The bottom line is that our work is far from over, and Medicaid continues to be at risk. This analysis aims to educate advocates about the current fiscal situation and its potential impact on people with I/DD.

National Policy Matters – Deficit Reduction: What Disability Advocates Need To Know

National Policy Matters – The Affordable Care Act: What Disability Advocates Need To Know

Now that the U.S. Supreme Court has affirmed the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the disability community must work to better understand the law and the many benefits it can provide to people with disabilities. This will be critical to the community’s role in helping to move states forward with implementation.

Numerous ACA provisions related to both acute care and long term services and supports hold great promise for improving the health and well-being of people with disabilities. This issue of National Policy Matters provides information about the major provisions and the status of their implementation.

National Policy Matters – The Affordable Care Act: What Disability Advocates Need To Know

Self-Determination and People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: What Does The Research Tell Us?

There exists an already substantive and still growing literature base pertaining to self- determination and people with disabilities. The intent of this slide show is to provide a synthesis of major findings in the area of self- determination pertaining to youth and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

http://www.aucd.org/docs/SD-WhatDoWeKnow.pdf

College Planning for Students with Disabilities

This booklet explains the process of preparing for and beginning college. It is written for youth and young adults with disabilities, and refers to many important and specific issues. The beginning sections refer to things to do starting in high school and provides advice on how to use the IEP process to move personal goals forward. Later sections refer to Section 504 of the federal Rehabilitation Act, and the Americans with Disabilities Act, both of which take on increased importance as students leave high school and enter college.

College Planning for Students with Disabilities is organized into the following sections:

 -The importance of self-advocacy

-Considerations during the admissions process

-Steps to follow once you select a college

-Your legal rights and responsibilities

This booklet is published by EducationQuest Foundation, a private, nonprofit organization with a mission to improve access to higher education in Nebraska. College Planning for Students with Disabilities is a supplement to EducationQuest Foundation’s College Prep Handbook.

http://apps.educationquest.org/pdfs/CP_Disability.pdf

Analysis of State Bullying Laws and Policies

Analysis of State Bullying Laws and Policies (2011) reviews states’ bullying laws and model bullying policies and school districts’ bullying policies. The report uses the U.S. Department of Education’s guidance document, “Anti-Bullying Policies: Examples of Provisions in State Laws,” as an organizing framework for the review.

Key findings include: As of April 2011, 46 states had bullying laws, 45 of which directed school districts to adopt bullying policies. Forty-one states had model bullying policies. Thirty-six states included provisions in their education codes prohibiting cyberbullying or bullying using electronic media. Thirteen states specified that schools have jurisdiction over off-campus behavior if it creates a hostile school environment.

http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/opepd/ppss/reports.html#safe

Still in the Shadows with the Future Uncertain

FINDS Report Cover

Still in the Shadows with the Future Uncertain

A report on family and individual needs for disability supports (FINDS)
Summary of Key Findings and A Call To Action
June 2011

The Family and Individual Needs for Disability Supports (FINDS) survey was conducted online from July 22, 2010 to October 31, 2010. The survey was widely disseminated through a variety of groups, including: the Association of University Centers on Disabilities, the American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, the American Network of Community Options and Resources, the National Association of Councils on Developmental Disabilities, Self-Advocates Becoming Empowered, the National Council on Independent Living, Best Buddies, Easter Seals, the Autism Society of America and state and local chapters of The Arc.

Families from all 50 states and DC completed surveys. People with disabilities responded from 38 states and DC. Nearly 5000 caregivers responded (4,962) as did 558 people with disabilities. The vast majority of caregiver respondents were family members (95%) who are living with their family member with disabilities (75%). Additional detail regarding respondents is available in the FINDS Technical Report.

The results are representative of the people who heard about the survey and responded and may not be representative of all people with disabilities and their families. Data analysis was performed by Lynda Anderson, Sheryl A. Larson, Allise Wuorio and K. Charlie Lakin of the Research and Training Center on Community Living, Institute on Community Integration, University of Minnesota.