Website: Transition in Action

Link

http://www.school2life.org/arcmecknc/

Description

The purpose of the project is to work with a variety of agencies in the community to expand an innovative program that meets the needs of the clients in the area and assists them in successfully transitioning from school to adult life. An interactive website is being developed to include three “doors” or sections to enter. One “door” is geared towards students and youth, another “door” is geared towards parents, guardians, and support staff. The third “door” is geared towards employers in the Business Leadership Network to post job openings. The internet is the wave of the future and by making this an interactive site and encouraging conversation between all parties we hope to advance transition outcomes for youth with disabilities locally. In addition, a transition specialist assists families inquiring about services and supports, provides agency referrals, coordinates educational workshops, and updates the curriculum as needed. The next component is a tool-kit for community coaches. This tool kit includes best-practice approaches for employment with an emphasis on self-determination.

Source

Submitted by The Arc of Mecklenburg County.

Website: Adult Education & Training Transition Services Program

Link

http://www.thearcofloudoun.org

Description

The Adult Education and Training Transition Services program focuses on teaching and supporting adults in vocational skills, independent living skills, behavior strategies, and self-advocacy. Transition Services seek to teach adults job skills needed in the community, on campus, as well as supporting them on job sites within the community. The Transition Services program will also train and support families, employers, and caregivers (such as group home staff) to help individuals remain independent and productive in the community. The on-campus vocational training area is used to train and prepare students for off-site employers in the areas of retail, mail delivery, data entry, computer lab, filing, and craft construction. Campus employment training includes job coaching, social skills support, and training for students in the Launch program (ages 14-22). Once students have completed the on-campus training, they are assisted at a community job site with decreasing support, establishing independent employment, and working toward employment for compensation.

Source

Submitted by The Arc of Loudoun.

Website: School-to-Community Transition Project

Link

http://www.thearcofracine.org

Description

The goal of our project is to raise expectations and increase knowledge and skills for students with disabilities, parents, and others. This includes increasing knowledge and skills about transition, self-advocacy, self-determination, and self-directed supports. Public awareness and educational activities of this project include a series of informational sessions for parents of students (14-21 years); direct mailing to area businesses; as well as a series of training programs available to students (14-21 years) around disability law, IEP’s, self-advocacy, and self-determination. In addition, the project will provide one-to-one assistance to participants (between the ages of 17-21 with I/DD) in the use of MAP (Making Action Plans) or other similar plans to determine each student’s strengths and interest; review the current IEP to ensure it has identified the strengths of the student as well as reviewing the student’s goals; and to provide training on post-secondary education, self-advocacy, self-determination, career information, best practices, etc.

Source

Submitted by The Arc of Racine County.

Website: Transition to Community

Link

http://www.arcmn.org

Description

The Arc of Minnesota is developing a student centered “Transition to Community” program as a key component of The Arc Academy of Advocacy & Support. The program’s intent is to increase student and parent knowledge and effectiveness in the areas of the special education system, transition planning, self-determination, self-advocacy, career awareness, and guardianship. The program includes a comprehensive package of curriculum, tools, and materials that focus on career awareness & exploration; self-determination; transition planning; parental involvement; and interagency collaboration. As part of the project, the program will be piloted and implemented through local Arc chapters in Minnesota, so that students and parents in communities across Minnesota have opportunities to increase their chances for a successful transition to the community. A series of “Train-the-Trainer” sessions that provide local Arc chapter staff opportunities to fully understand the “Transition to Community” curriculum, tools, and materials so that they can effectively and successfully implement the program at the local level.

Source

Submitted by The Arc of Minnesota.

Website: Community Action Network (CAN) Project

Link

http://www.arcvc.org

Description

The purpose of the Community Action Network (CAN) project is to provide transition age youth an opportunity for a time limited, comprehensive, and inclusive post-secondary experience that includes educational, vocational, and social opportunities. At its core, this project integrates best practices, such as person-centered thinking and self determination, as the guiding principles and actions that assist individuals to achieve greater influence, independence, and control as they transition into adult life. This multi-disciplinary style and multi-learning approach meets the student where their strengths lie and accommodate barriers in a multitude of strategies.

Source

Submitted by The Arc of Ventura County.

Website: Transition Support Program (TSP)

Link

http://thearcsf.org

Description

The Arc of San Francisco engages transition age youth and their caregivers by providing open houses, tours, school site visits, and other outreach efforts to enlighten them about community-based services. Parental involvement and education is mandatory for participant enrollment and follows an extended process by which families incrementally deepen their participation in person-centered transition planning. Parents and guardians are offered a monthly newsletter featuring tasks to develop specific skills and quarterly topical workshops that offer guidance, support, and structured activities for preparing their children, and themselves, for transition from school-based to community-based services. The major component of the TSP is transition-age youth skill building for adulthood. Regular, structured activities for transition-age youth with developmental disabilities occurs within a stepped, curriculum which gradually integrates participants in community-based services, independent living, employment, and adult relationships.

Source

Submitted by The Arc of San Francisco.

Website: Life After High School

Link

http://www.thearcolc.org

Description

The Arc, Oneida-Lewis Chapter provides a one-year program for youth with significant disabilities who are in their last year of high school and are expected to graduate or exit high school following completion of the project year. The student is exposed to a world of new and continued learning opportunities both on a college campus and in the community so they gain the skills and confidence to function as independently as possible, once they leave the supports they are entitled to in high school. Following assessment and training, the individual leaves the program with a written plan that includes action steps that move them through their transition from high school to work and adult living. It was developed to help youth with disabilities, their families, and the professionals who work with them to meet the challenge that transition from the secondary school system brings. Information and resources are made available to the individuals as they execute their plan. They are taught the skills of self-determination and self-advocacy. The students in the project are introduced to the adult service systems and natural supports that can assist them with seeking post-secondary training, employment, and services such as transportation assistance and independent living.

Source

Submitted by NYSARC- The Arc Oneida-Lewis Chapter.

Website: School-to-Community Transition Project

Link

http://www.wecahr.org

Description

The transition piece from school to community is one that involves many different components and therefore merits the involvement of various agencies and providers. Activities include advocating for the involvement of necessary providers and services while serving as a consistent resource throughout the life of the partnership or agreement. We will do this by creating a specific and purposeful plan for the client that will outline goals and steps to ensure the client achieves a successful transition.

Source

Submitted by Western Connecticut Association for Human Rights.

Website: Jobs @ 21 Partnership Project

Link

http://www.arcwa.org

Description

The Arc of Washington State’s Jobs @ 21 Partnership Project seeks to ensure special education teachers and parents have information to help young adults with developmental disabilities access gainful employment. The project will have three focuses: 1) train parents about the IEP and transition process; 2) provide scholarships for interested special education teachers to attend the Employment Professional Certificate Program; and 3) provide information to state elected officials about the importance of funding supported employment once students graduate from high school.

Source

Submitted by The Arc of Washington State.

Website: School-to-Community Transition Program

Link

http://www.arcselac.org/

Description

The Arc’s School-to-Community Transition (SCT) service consists of a high school transition coordinator, adult transition trainer, and a high school advocate. Under The Arc’s direction, the SCT team identifies specific issues that affect each participant’s successful transition, assists in breaking down transition barriers, and coordinates efforts to ensure successful outcomes determined by participants. The SCT team is joined by local school district transition coordinators to ensure its success. The SCT team starts working with students during the transition high school years (ages 18-22) in order to get to know the students and their families and learn of their dreams and desires. The service continues through graduation and two years following school (ages 22-24) to ensure that the goals identified by the student and their families are achieved. A new SCT transition plan is developed which includes the additional resources and supports provided by The Arc’s SCT team.

Source

Submitted by The Arc of Los Angeles and Orange Counties.