Website: Transition in Action

Link

http://www.school2life.org/arcmecknc/

Description

The purpose of the project is to work with a variety of agencies in the community to expand an innovative program that meets the needs of the clients in the area and assists them in successfully transitioning from school to adult life. An interactive website is being developed to include three “doors” or sections to enter. One “door” is geared towards students and youth, another “door” is geared towards parents, guardians, and support staff. The third “door” is geared towards employers in the Business Leadership Network to post job openings. The internet is the wave of the future and by making this an interactive site and encouraging conversation between all parties we hope to advance transition outcomes for youth with disabilities locally. In addition, a transition specialist assists families inquiring about services and supports, provides agency referrals, coordinates educational workshops, and updates the curriculum as needed. The next component is a tool-kit for community coaches. This tool kit includes best-practice approaches for employment with an emphasis on self-determination.

Source

Submitted by The Arc of Mecklenburg County.

Website: Adult Education & Training Transition Services Program

Link

http://www.thearcofloudoun.org

Description

The Adult Education and Training Transition Services program focuses on teaching and supporting adults in vocational skills, independent living skills, behavior strategies, and self-advocacy. Transition Services seek to teach adults job skills needed in the community, on campus, as well as supporting them on job sites within the community. The Transition Services program will also train and support families, employers, and caregivers (such as group home staff) to help individuals remain independent and productive in the community. The on-campus vocational training area is used to train and prepare students for off-site employers in the areas of retail, mail delivery, data entry, computer lab, filing, and craft construction. Campus employment training includes job coaching, social skills support, and training for students in the Launch program (ages 14-22). Once students have completed the on-campus training, they are assisted at a community job site with decreasing support, establishing independent employment, and working toward employment for compensation.

Source

Submitted by The Arc of Loudoun.

Website: ARCedu

Link

http://www.arcric.org

Description

ARCedu provides a structured curriculum which allows students to gain basic skills in a particular field, helping make them stronger candidates for job placement. The curriculum consists of classroom training as well as hands-on experience. ARCedu involves five 6-week courses in specific areas, based on areas of interest identified by students attending their last high school year. Successful students receive a Certificate of Completion for the course. The first 6-week course offered is in industrial/light assembly, building on The Arc of Rock Island County’s expertise in this area. Subsequent courses relate to the areas of retail and customer service, clerical, food service, housekeeping and custodial, data entry, and landscaping. Curriculum components are tailored to specific job skills and job related issues for each of the five areas and include topics which carry across curricula such as: dressing for success, resume building, time management, and managing conflict in the work place. The courses include pairing students with business mentors in the particular field and job shadowing. This allows individuals the opportunity to interact with business professionals and build a network with adult individuals with developmental disabilities.

Source

Submitted by The Arc of Rock Island County.

Website: Project Opportunity: Transition to Employment

Link

http://www.arcdc.org

Description

Project Opportunity: Transition to Employment trains students with disabilities at a business or organization worksite and employs them at jobs as they become available at the business or organization where they are trained. The majority of the job training program occurs in the workplace. Rotation worksites and potential placements are identified through collaborative consultations. The participant/trainees rotate through these settings where they learn and practice the various skills and tasks necessary to qualify for a job in the workplace where they are being trained. These “rotations” are where the students also learn and practice transferable skills that can be utilized in a variety of jobs which might conform to their interests. A participant/trainee remains in job training only until he/she is determined to be ready to complete for an open position in the business/training site that fits their skills and abilities.

Source

Submitted by The Arc of Davidson County.

Website: Out Community Life Program

Link

http://www.arcbatonrouge.org

Description

The Arc Baton Rouge’s Job Placement Program assists students to secure employment; works closely with “Work Study” staff to identify students considered ‘work ready’, and facilitates their first exposure to the working world. The focus of our project is building a bridge between school to the community and work for students with disabilities. A smooth transition from school to adult living enables the person to live as independently as possible. Individualized supports and services specific to the person’s needs allow participants to attain self-confidence in an age-appropriate environment. In addition to the introduction of the curriculum at the beginning of the spring semester of the person’s junior year, inclusive and interactive community-based experiences are provided; such as volunteering, jobsite tours, internships, job shadowing, and placements/coaching.

Resource

Submitted by The Arc of Baton Rouge.

Website: Arc in Hawaii & Kona Transition Services

Link

http://www.thearcinhawaii.org

Description

The Arc in Hawaii and the Arc of Kona Transition Services project focuses on the transition of youth with intellectual and developmental disabilities from high school to employment. Youth between ages of 14 to 23 years, who are eligible for services from the Developmental Disabilities Division of the Hawaii State Department of Health and receiving special education services are eligible to participate. The students and their families are offered the opportunity to participate in the program and receive training in how to access the support systems necessary to achieving each individual’s employment goals.

Source

Submitted by The Arc in Hawaii and The Arc of Kona.

Website: Neighborhood Experiences

Link

http://www.slarc.org

Description

The Neighborhood Experiences Project provides young adults, (ages 16 to 20) with developmental disabilities the support they need to take advantage of opportunities in their own community. Participants engage in at least 4-5 volunteer and/or work experiences throughout the summer that help them achieve personal and career goals. At the end of the summer, each individual works with their staff partner to create a professional portfolio and resume showcasing his or her accomplishments. Throughout the school year individuals are attending employment workshops, presentations, and volunteering in community service projects.

Source

Submitted by St. Louis Arc.

Website: Louisiana Green Corps

Link

http://www.arcgno.org

Description

The LA Green Corps works with local high schools in Orleans and Jefferson Parish to co-enroll youth with intellectual and developmental disabilities into the LA Green Corps while they continue with regular academic school work. Participants undergo Life Skills training (whereby learning self care and independent living), work adjustment and readiness training, and have the opportunity to receive certifications in technical curriculums (alongside peers without disabilities). Through participating in technical education and service projects, Corps members are able to experience vocational education and gain a broader perspective on the type of work activities they prefer. Through the development of an Individual Development Plan (IDP), each Corps member works on transitional planning from the very beginning of the program term. Corps members benefit from a close network of peers with and without disabilities, staff members who serve as mentors and teachers, and parents who are engaged from the beginning of the term. Throughout the program term, participants are encouraged to direct their own behaviors and becoming involved in their own life decisions and transition process.

Source

Submitted by Arc of Greater New Orleans.

Website: Transition-to-Work Program

Link

http://www.arcgreatertwincities.org

Description

Arc Greater Twin Cities Transition-to-Work program is based on models and concepts that are well recognized as best practices for transition. The program is designed to ensure that parents, guardians, and self-advocates have information, skills, and tools to develop transition plans that will result in community-based jobs. The program is designed to increase parent and student involvement in the IEP meetings by helping them understand the transition planning process and identifying essential skills for employment and community living. Person Centered Planning is another tool to help increase parental involvement by bringing together family members to help develop a plan and build networks for support. This plan can direct development of the transition IEP and other supports needed for successful transition from school to community living.

Source

Submitted by Arc Greater Twin Cities.

Website: Project SEARCH

Link

http://www.projectsearch.us

Description

Project SEARCH is dedicated to providing education and training to young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities through an innovative workforce and career development model that benefits the individual,workplace,and community. Our primary goal is to secure competitive employment outcomes for each of our student graduates.

Source

Submitted by Cincinnati Children’s.