Website: Transition Support Program (TSP)

Link

http://thearcsf.org

Description

The Arc of San Francisco engages transition age youth and their caregivers by providing open houses, tours, school site visits, and other outreach efforts to enlighten them about community-based services. Parental involvement and education is mandatory for participant enrollment and follows an extended process by which families incrementally deepen their participation in person-centered transition planning. Parents and guardians are offered a monthly newsletter featuring tasks to develop specific skills and quarterly topical workshops that offer guidance, support, and structured activities for preparing their children, and themselves, for transition from school-based to community-based services. The major component of the TSP is transition-age youth skill building for adulthood. Regular, structured activities for transition-age youth with developmental disabilities occurs within a stepped, curriculum which gradually integrates participants in community-based services, independent living, employment, and adult relationships.

Source

Submitted by The Arc of San Francisco.

Website: School-to-Community Transition Project

Link

http://www.wecahr.org

Description

The transition piece from school to community is one that involves many different components and therefore merits the involvement of various agencies and providers. Activities include advocating for the involvement of necessary providers and services while serving as a consistent resource throughout the life of the partnership or agreement. We will do this by creating a specific and purposeful plan for the client that will outline goals and steps to ensure the client achieves a successful transition.

Source

Submitted by Western Connecticut Association for Human Rights.

Website: School-to-Community Transition Program

Link

http://www.arcselac.org/

Description

The Arc’s School-to-Community Transition (SCT) service consists of a high school transition coordinator, adult transition trainer, and a high school advocate. Under The Arc’s direction, the SCT team identifies specific issues that affect each participant’s successful transition, assists in breaking down transition barriers, and coordinates efforts to ensure successful outcomes determined by participants. The SCT team is joined by local school district transition coordinators to ensure its success. The SCT team starts working with students during the transition high school years (ages 18-22) in order to get to know the students and their families and learn of their dreams and desires. The service continues through graduation and two years following school (ages 22-24) to ensure that the goals identified by the student and their families are achieved. A new SCT transition plan is developed which includes the additional resources and supports provided by The Arc’s SCT team.

Source

Submitted by The Arc of Los Angeles and Orange Counties.

Website: Self-Directed IEPs

Link

http://www.thearctn.org

Description

The Arc of Tennessee is providing self-directed IEP training to students, educators, and families who are involved in the secondary transition planning process. Typically developing peers are also trained to help co-facilitate meetings with students who need additional support. The purpose of the project is to teach students how to do their own IEP meetings and to teach parents, educators, and typically developing peers (where appropriate) on how to support them in this process. Self-directed IEPs are not common practice in Tennessee and will provide educators with a new tool that will help improve secondary transition outcomes for students receiving special education services.

Source

Submitted by The Arc of Tennessee.

Website: Keep Achieving (KACH) at Brookdale

Link

http://www.arcofmonmouth.org/kach

Description

The Arc of Monmouth has collaborated with Brookdale Community College to address the needs of transitioning young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities ages 18 – 21 that have accepted their high school diploma and elected a college experience; and 21 – 26 year-olds who have graduated high school and would like to continue their education. The project provides a variety of classroom and experiential learning at the college and in the community over six college semesters during a three-year period. At the completion of their college experience, students should gain the skills and confidence necessary for them to succeed in their chosen paid or volunteer career field.

Source

Submitted by Arc of Monmouth.

Website: ARCedu

Link

http://www.arcric.org

Description

ARCedu provides a structured curriculum which allows students to gain basic skills in a particular field, helping make them stronger candidates for job placement. The curriculum consists of classroom training as well as hands-on experience. ARCedu involves five 6-week courses in specific areas, based on areas of interest identified by students attending their last high school year. Successful students receive a Certificate of Completion for the course. The first 6-week course offered is in industrial/light assembly, building on The Arc of Rock Island County’s expertise in this area. Subsequent courses relate to the areas of retail and customer service, clerical, food service, housekeeping and custodial, data entry, and landscaping. Curriculum components are tailored to specific job skills and job related issues for each of the five areas and include topics which carry across curricula such as: dressing for success, resume building, time management, and managing conflict in the work place. The courses include pairing students with business mentors in the particular field and job shadowing. This allows individuals the opportunity to interact with business professionals and build a network with adult individuals with developmental disabilities.

Source

Submitted by The Arc of Rock Island County.

Website: Community Transition Partnership

Link

http://www.rensselaerarc.org

Description

With self-determination as the cornerstone of this project, young adults with disabilities utilize person-centered planning to direct the course of their own life while surrounded by people that know and care about them. A variety of person-centered planning tools are utilized including the Framework for Planning which provides a structured approach to helping people with disabilities think about their life focus, develop a positive profile, and an action plan to achieve their goals.

Source

Submitted by NYSARC – Rensselaer.

Website: Ready @ 21

Link

http://www.thearcofpgc.org

Description

Ready @ 21, students develop an Individual Development Plan (IDP) that outlines skills needed in the area of education, employment, and community living while focusing on self-advocacy, self-awareness, and self-determination. As the students develop their portfolios and complete career assessments, they identify their own likes, dislikes, strengths, challenges, and areas of interest. The process of developing resumes and cover letters, as well as learning business etiquette, goal setting, public speaking, and interviewing skills provides the students with a multitude of employment readiness skills. In addition, they are supported in locating community resources through role-play, games, group discussions, art projects, and community outings. Students are able to gain awareness of a variety of employment activities on the college campus through workforce development classes and community employers such as Walmart.

Source

Submitted by The Arc of Prince George’s County.

Website: Creating Environments for Ongoing Success

Link

http://www.arcphiladelphia.org

Description

The Philadelphia ARC’s transition program focuses on student-focused planning and transition goal development; career exploration and natural environment learning. The belief is that, people with disabilities can be capable employees if skills and interests are matched and appropriate education and supports are provided. Students are referred and must demonstrate a commitment to being employed. Person centered planning is facilitated and transitional goals are developed. Short-term competitive employment situations are used to transition to longer term vocational opportunities. Training of job site staff is provided to assure that the staff is comfortable with issues of disability and employment.

Source

Submitted by The Arc of Philadelphia.

Website: Project Employ

Link

http://www.arcoregon.org

Description

Project Employ training provides participants with person-centered employment planning strategies, identifies their roles as professionals, gives participants the opportunity to better understand the difference in service deliveries among agencies, and a chance to share ideas that will provide greater success for transition students to obtain employment. In addition, two full-day Person-Centered Employment Planning Workshops are conducted each school year, whose primary design is to help students and parents develop an initial draft of a Person-Centered Plan. Students are matched with peer mentors from Emerging Leaders Northwest (ELNW) for on-going technical assistance and support related to employment and education goals. Parents benefit from technical assistance and resources provided by Family and Community Together (FACT). Professionals are supported with technical assistance through direct interaction with Project Employ staff and technical assistance support contractors.

Source

Submitted by The Arc of Oregon.