Academy for Inclusive Learning and Social Growth

The Kennesaw State University Academy for Inclusive Learning is a unique two year certificate program designed to provide students with developmental disabilities a college experience. This is an inclusive program focused on balancing academics, wellness and employability.

http://www.kennesaw.edu/chhs/centers/aiae/

Do-It Program

The international DO-IT Center promotes the success of individuals with disabilities in postsecondary education and careers, using technology as an empowering tool. DO-IT (Disabilities, Opportunities, Internetworking, and Technology) serves to increase the successful participation of individuals with disabilities in challenging academic programs such as those in science, engineering, mathematics, and technology. Primary funding for DO-IT is provided by the National Science Foundation, the State of Washington, and the U.S. Department of Education.

http://www.washington.edu/doit/

College is Possible for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

Article from February 19, 2009 U.S. News highlighting one young woman with Down Syndrome’s pursuit of her Associate’s Degree and the push for further research in the field of postsecondary education for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities.

http://www.transitiontocollege.net/percpubs/CollegeIsPossible.pdf

Publication: Engaging Youth in Work Experiences

Link

http://www.ncwd-youth.info/innovative-strategies/practice-briefs/engaging-youth-in-work-experiences

Description

This brief describes the strategies and resources used by several successful youth programs to engage youth in work experiences, including youth with disabilities. Work experiences are both paid and unpaid opportunities to work and practice career readiness skills. The work experiences described in this brief include internships, summer jobs, youth-run businesses/entrepreneurship, service projects and volunteer work, and part-time jobs.

Source

Submitted by NCWD/YOUTH

Publication: Leading Practices on Disability Inclusion

Link

http://www.usbln.org/pdf-docs/Leading_Practices_on_Disability_Inclusion.pdf

Description

The US Chamber of commerce and the US Business Leadership Network invited business leaders to share their successful disability inclusion strategies and from that initiative developed “Leading Practices on Disability Inclusion”. This publication highlights successful strategies that can be used by businesses of all sizes to create a more inclusive workplace, marketplace, and supply chain. Real-life examples, such as these, are important to help businesses realize the wide range of opportunities available and the potential for replicating success.

Source

Submitted by the US Chamber of commerce and the US Business Leadership Network

Publication: Green Jobs Resource Guide for Individuals with Disabilities

Link

http://www.dol.gov/odep/pdf/GreenResourceGuide.pdf

Description

Green jobs are jobs in industries that help the environment or use environmentally-friendly materials and processes. This guide includes information about where to search for jobs, training opportunities and job skills associated with the increase in “green” jobs.

Source

Submitted by U.S. Department of Labor

Website: Empower The Village

Link

http://www.empowerthevillage.com

Description

Elizabeth Villanueva created this website after the state of California has continued to make budget cuts to children and families in the Early Start Program for the past three years. The website is free and a continuation of the vendor program Niños Del Cielo.

Source

Submitted by Elizabeth Villanueva.

Website: Shelby County Transition Services

Link

http://www.thearcofshelby.org

Description

Participating students and their families receive a broad spectrum of services and opportunities designed to increase the probability of greater success following school completion. The core component of the project is informed choice by students and families. Students must have the opportunity to participate in their own future planning and decision-making to be based on their own unique dreams and goals. Teachers, families, and support groups must promote opportunities for students to gain knowledge and skills in decision making and in knowledge of what their communities offer. The project includes teacher training, an emphasis on self-determination within the classroom and in the community, employment and work experiences, transition planning, and family training. Through workshops and trainings, transition teachers and job coaches from high schools in Shelby County offered a focus on teaching strategies and how to promote and encourage self-determination in their students as well as why self-determination impacts successful transition from school to community and how to bring attention to these skills. Students their families participating in the intensive education and support program are assisted by a Family Advocate to focus on futures planning, family values, and self-determination, choice making, personal advocacy, and utilization of community resources and supports.

Source

Submitted by The Arc of Shelby County, Inc.

Website: Project SEE

Link

http://www.arcwake.org

Description

Project SEE provides students with access to a variety of work settings/samplings which allow the participating students to make informed vocational choices. Participating students gain valuable insight into their occupational interests and strengths as well as develop skills to enhance their opportunities for employment in the community after completing high school. Project SEE staff encourages the development of natural supports and promotes the philosophy of inclusion, within the work environment. Under the expanded Project SEE school-year program, approximately 20 high school students with developmental disabilities are working at volunteer host job sites with a college student intern job coach. The ratio is two participating students per one student intern job coach. These students are selected in conjunction with case managers and occupational preparation teachers in the Wake County Public School System. The students are paid at the prevailing minimum wage through program funds. Participating high school students with developmental disabilities work at job sites during or at the end of the school day; they are transported from their high school to the job site through transportation provided by the Wake County Public School System. Transportation from the job site to the student’s home is arranged by participating students.

Source

Submitted by The Arc of Wake County.

Website: Transitional Supported Employment from School to Work

Link

http://www.thearcofyorkcounty.org

Description

The Arc of York County’s project is focused on preparing high school students for competitive employment following graduation from public school. Most students with disabilities have very limited or no real life experience with real work prior to graduation. Neither students nor their families are well prepared for the issues of entering the work force. This experience differs from students who do not have a disability who typically will have a part-time job while in school and employment in the summer prior to graduation. The project better prepares students for post-graduation employment by providing real employment experiences during the school year, part-time employment, and summer employment. Paid employment and work experience is the primary objective of the project. The project aims to provide real work experience during the school year as part of the student’s educational program, part-time employment, and summer employment using our supported employment support and training staff. The current school system and community service system for people with intellectual disabilities do not fund/support summer employment or out-of-school service for students. The project provides support for students to gain and maintain employment.

Source

Submitted by The Arc of York County.